Draw to Win or Visual Thinking

Draw to Win or Visual Thinking

Continuing the topic of reviews of techniques I regularly use to rock my creativity, I’d like to share with you today a review of an interesting book: “Draw to Win: A Crash Course on How to Lead, Sell, and Innovate With Your Visual Mind”, written by Dan Roam.

This is an exceptionally useful book for anyone who can’t or isn’t used to drawing, explaining their ideas to someone else. The book makes you think both about the form of the material being presented and about how to actually present that material. Especially for those who often convince someone of something by scribbling with a pen on a napkin… You have to be able to scribble skillfully and take into account the various points that are described in the book.

Trying to retell this book is useless. Trying to read it is even more useless. You have to work with this book. Only then will it have an effect. Personally, for example, I have changed my system of work with books and articles, adding to it a lot of visualization… I’m not even talking about presentations for clients.

“Draw to Win” doesn’t teach how to prepare presentations. It is specifically about thinking, which can be very useful in preparing for a presentation. Of course this book is not a panacea, but it gives a good direction for reflection and independent work…

This is the entry I made on my blog about this book more than three years ago, when I read the first edition of this book. During this time, I have been convinced of the above in practice many times.

Draw to Win or Visual Thinking

Buy this book on Amazon.

To be honest, the book is hard to read. This is despite the large number of illustrations. The author often takes the reader away from the main subject matter himself, immersing him in excessive detail of the various situations he uses to illustrate certain points in the book. It gets a lot easier if you start to see the book as a practice book and work with it as a methodological aid.

The book itself is arranged simply. At the heart of the book is a description of the process of visual thinking, then follows with a detailed description of each step, which I have condensed into a traditional summap.

After reading this book, I noticed an interesting feature – as soon as I myself begin to draw, explaining something to my interlocutor, the interlocutor himself begins to actively use pen and paper.

I will conclude with a quote that had perhaps even more of an impact on me than the book itself:

One of the most important advantages of visual thinking is the ability to explain things so that the complex becomes more understandable, but this does not mean that effective and correct visual thinking requires only the ability to simplify. The true purpose of visual thinking is to make the complex understandable by putting it into a visual form, not by simplifying it. And whether this requires drawing a simple drawing with few details or a deliberately complex and sophisticated one is almost always determined by the audience.


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