Living in the style “Jazz do it”

Living in the style “Jazz do it”

Many of us strive for self-knowledge, wanting to make practical sense out of it. I am no exception. I have made several important discoveries along the way, one of which I would like to share here.

Life is music!

My vocal coach says that you can tell whether a person is a “baby” or a “sage” by the kind of music he listens to. Music, indeed, is a fitting metaphor for taking a comprehensive look at a person’s life. If it matters so much what a person listens to, then the music of his soul can tell almost everything about him.

I am no longer a baby, but I have not yet become a sage. I have many roles, each with its own musical instrument. The main rhythm behind the drums is set by the entrepreneur, the keys are played by the business coach, and the wide range of wind instruments gives flight to the creativity of the artist. There are also vocal parts, but I cannot yet judge them.

The mind is responsible for the sound of the instruments. The heart combines the sounds into an ensemble. The chamber music of the soul tunes the heart. This is how my music is born. The mind does not always listen to the heart, and the heart does not always touch the strings of the soul. But when there is a unity of mind, heart, and soul, wonderful music emerges! In these moments I feel like a completely happy person.

The mind is responsible for the sound of the instruments. The heart combines the sounds into an ensemble. The soul’s chamber music tunes the heart. This is how my music is born.

Improvisation

For a life full of improvisation, jazz is the best. In this music, you have to be able to move and solve puzzles. You have to do it at the same time and to the beat.

In the jazz every session has its own rhythm, its own dynamics. Without movement there is no life in every sense, that’s why jazz, like life, doesn’t wait for anybody.

The puzzles are the riddles of the environment. The world around us is symbolic and mysterious. It waits for us to act and answer its puzzles. I give the answer as I love and as I know how. When we play music, we change the environment, and it answers us with new riddles. This is how we live in a constant dialogue with ourselves and with the world.

Questions are more important than answers. The question mark after a good question is a flashlight that can illuminate awareness and help you make a responsible decision.

Sometimes there are scheduled concerts. This already requires special preparation and regular rehearsals. That’s why I prepare my best performances in advance, carefully selecting my repertoire.

The environment plays a very important role in a person’s development. Even if I think that the music comes from within, after the performance I am always aware of the direct influence of the environment.

Living a life of jazz is very important to be able to hear, listen and understand what you’re playing, how you’re playing and who you’re doing it for. It requires an open heart and a free mind. That doesn’t always happen. Sometimes the head is cluttered with unclosed gestalts, and the heart creeps with fear of passions and temptations. Then various conflicts arise, and your music becomes extremely bad! Failures happen. But better a series of small failures than a series of small successes. Failures connect you to reality and force you to improve your skills without stopping the movement.

Move where? And why? These are the “damned” questions that have disrupted more than one jazz concert! The soul has its own score, and the libretto was given to it before I was born. Of course, the soul is interested in these questions. It knows its own way.

Like many meaning seekers, I believe that questions are more important than answers. The question mark after a good question is a flashlight that can illuminate awareness and help make a responsible decision.

Living the jazz lifestyle, it’s important to be able to hear, listen and understand what you’re playing, how you’re playing and who you’re playing it for. It requires an open heart and a free mind.

Top questions for a jazz musician:

  1. Who can you single out in your ensemble of musicians who could have a brilliant solo career?
  2. What piece of music would you like to perform?
  3. What would be the last tune of your soul?

Today I’m playing jazz, tomorrow I might be a student in the vocal department of a conservatory or singing amazing chants in the choir. It’s all up to God’s will. One thing I know for sure: if music sounds, it sounds only in the present.


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